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Holiday Treats for Fido

The holiday season is in full swing! Many people enjoy baking and cooking at this special time of year. After all, those delicious seasonal dishes are a big part of many holiday celebrations. If you have a dog, your canine buddy will likely be paying very close attention to all those yummy goodies. Dog owners need to be very careful with what they offer their pets, however, as many of our favorite foods are toxic to Fido. Here, a Cherry Hill, NJ vet lists some good holiday treats for dogs.

Meat, Fish, and Poultry

Nothing gets that furry tail wagging like a yummy main course! It’s perfectly fine to offer your canine pal some of that turkey, chicken, duck, steak, beef, or fish. Just be sure that Fido’s special dinner is cooked, deboned, and free of skin and fat. You also want to be sure to offer your pooch only plain meat, without spices or seasonings. Hold the gravy, though: it’s too rich for dogs, and could contain unsafe ingredients. However, you can offer your pup some sodium-free broth.

Veggies and Fruits

You don’t want to give your dog too many fruits and veggies: after all, Fido is a carnivore. However, these things are fine in small amounts, and can make a great side dish for your canine buddy. Some good dog-safe fruits include bananas, apple slices, blueberries, and strawberries. Cooked, unseasoned pumpkin, potatoes, green beans, squash, carrots, and peas are all safe. As with meat, you want to be sure to give your furry friend his food plain, without toppings, spices, or gravy.

Other Foods

Fido can also have small amounts of other foods, such as cheese, eggs, and peanut butter. If you’re making homemade dog food or treats, you can also add wheat-germ oil, plain yogurt, bacon bits, or whole-wheat flour to your recipe. Ask your vet for specific recommendations.

Dangerous Foods

It’s important to know what foods are dangerous for your furry buddy. Some things to keep away from Fido include chocolate; alcohol; caffeine; nuts; pitted fruits; raw dough, meat, or yeast; grapes, currants, and raisins; and anything containing xylitol. Garlic and onions are also on the no-no list, along with their cousins, scallions and chives. Ask your vet for more information.

Happy Holidays! Please contact us, your Cherry Hill, NJ vet clinic, with any questions about your dog’s health, care, or diet.

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